My experience with staff surveys

For any organization to be successful, it needs to be realized that the backbone of a business is its workforce.

The driving force behind all operations and the smooth running of the organization are the employees and it is very crucial for the management to realize the importance of keeping employees motivated.

While there are many widely used methods of motivating employees, such as bonuses or fringe benefits, there is one method that is frequently overlooked; keeping the employees involved.

Taking feedback from workers and encouraging two-communication is one of the most effective measure a company can take to ensure the satisfaction and motivation of their employees because when they are asked for their opinions on certain business decisions, it makes them feel valued and thus, instills a sense of belonging towards the organization.

Having employees that feel a sense of belonging towards an organization reduces employee turnover and makes it easier for firms to retain experienced employees that are an asset to the firm. Having a good employee retention rate also leads to the improvement of the company’s image in the market and industry and allows for greater opportunities for growth and the greater development of ideas as the employees treat the whole organization as their own.

There are numerous ways in which a company can be more engaged with their employees and how they’re feeling; one that I experimented with recently is a pulse survey.

A Pulse survey is a quicker and simpler version of an engagement survey. As their name suggests, pulse surveys give the management regular, quick check-ins in the health of the workforce. They help emphasize on the aspects that need improvement and measure the level of employee satisfaction. Additionally, they also helped me in evaluating work-relationships and the environment around the organization.

As compared to engagement surveys, I found that pulse surveys are quick and to the point. They not require detailed answers to a wide variety of questions; the ones used in my organization have just under 10 questions. Moreover, they are also conducted more frequently than engagement surveys which allowed the management to recognize and solve arising issues promptly. The small number of questions facilitated the identification of the issue quickly and enabled the management to focus on a particular current goal or target that needs feedback.

Furthermore, employee feedback was more frequently received and appreciated through pulse surveys and they allowed for quicker and more accurate comparisons to be made. They are faster and more comprehensive to complete which is a source of convenience for the employees as well.

Additionally, I found that they can be used to spread awareness about certain issues around the organization which can prove extremely beneficial for the management and the organization as a whole. Pulse surveys are a great way to target a certain group of employees; whether it is for special tasks or for a special localized audit. They make sure that everyone is involved in the business and promote effective communication. However, it is also crucial to have the entire organization on board when it comes to understanding the purpose, requirement, and benefits of using Pulse surveys.

The post “My experience with staff surveys” was originally posted on http://www.corelmag.com/2019/03/my-experience-with-staff-surveys.html

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Author: Corel Magaletta

Hi! I’m Corel, I’m in my 30s (you do not need to know which one) and I have a husband, J and two kids: Miss 3 and Master 6. We live in sunny Newcastle, a two hour drive north of a city you might know called Sydney and love spending time baking biscuits and playing in the waves at Merewether. I work full time and am building my own business on the side, so between that and raising two energetic kids, I enjoy any downtime I can muster with bubble baths, regular date nights with J and reflecting about life on this here blog.

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